Saturday, September 3, 2016

Punky Brewster

Penelope "Punky" Brewster (Soleil Moon Frye) is a warm, funny and bright child. Her father walked out on her family, then her mother abandoned her at a Chicago shopping center, leaving Punky alone with her dog Brandon. Afterwards, Punky discovered a vacant apartment in a local building.

The building was managed by Henry Warnimont (George Gaynes) - an elderly, widowed photographer with a grouchy streak. Punky hit it off with young Cherie Johnson (played by Cherie Johnson, the niece of series creator David W. Duclon...and the only performer on the series who used her real-life name for her character), who lived in Henry's building with her grandmother Betty (Susie Garrett). Betty worked as an RN at the local Cook County Hospital. Henry discovers Punky in the empty apartment across from his, and hears her story.

The relationship between the two blossoms, despite red tape from social workers (who ultimately rally to Henry's side). As their day in court approaches, the state forces Punky to stay at Fenster Hall, a shelter for orphaned and abandoned children, which makes her realize how close she has grown to Henry. Finally, their day arrives, and the court approves Henry to become Punky's foster dad. Later on, Henry legally adopts her.

Punky's other friends are geeky Allen Anderson (Casey Ellison) and stuck-up rich girl Margaux Kramer (Ami Foster). During the NBC run, Punky's teachers were regularly seen; in the first season, cheerful Mrs. Morton (Dody Goodman) and in the second season, hip Mike Fulton (T.K. Carter, pre-Saved By the Bell). Mike formed a close relationship with Punky and her friends, and was also portrayed as a social crusader of sorts.

Also in the first season, Margaux's socialite-mother (Loyita Chapel) appeared on a recurring basis - as did kooky maintenance man Eddie Malvin (Eddie Deezen). Eddie disappeared after the first several episodes.

Beginning in 1984, NBC aired the sitcom on Sundays. Because the show had many young viewers and was scheduled after football games (which tended to run long), six fifteen-minute episodes were produced. This was done rather than joining a full-length episode in progress, so as not to disappoint children watching the program



No comments:

Post a Comment